Can I Get Disability Benefits for Crohn’s Disease?

If you have Crohn’s disease, Social Security disability benefits may be available. To determine whether you are disabled by Crohn’s disease, Social Security Administration first considers whether your Crohn’s disease is severe enough to meet or equal a listing at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See How to Get Disability Benefits for Crohn’s Disease by Meeting a Listing. If you meet or equal a listing because of Crohn’s disease, you are considered disabled.

If your Crohn’s disease is not severe enough to equal or meet a listing, Social Security Administration must assess your Step 4 and Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See Residual Functional Capacity Assessment for Crohn’s Disease.

About Crohn’s Disease and Disability

What Is Crohn’s Disease?

Crohn’s disease is a chronic, inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract (see Figure 1 below) that produces symptoms such as severe abdominal pain, cramping, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, and insomnia.

With Crohn’s disease, the body’s immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, causing inflammation.

Other Symptoms

Crohn’s disease may involve the entire alimentary tract from the mouth to the anus.

In addition to the common symptoms of abdominal pain, cramping, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, and insomnia, you may also experience fecal incontinence, rectal bleeding, fever, vomiting, arthralgia (joint pain), abdominal tenderness, palpable abdominal mass (usually inflamed loops of bowel) and perineal disease. You may also have weight loss or other indications of malnutrition.

The human gastrointestinal tract

Figure 1: The human gastrointestinal tract.

When Does it Occur?

Crohn’s disease can occur at any age. However, it is most common for it to begin either when you are in your teens and twenties or between your fifties and seventies.

Cause and Treatment

The cause of Crohn’s disease is unknown, and it is rarely curable. Recurrence may be a lifelong problem even after surgery. Treatment is usually limited to controlling the symptoms.

Related Conditions

Crohn’s disease is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The various forms of inflammatory bowel disease share similar symptoms and treatments.

Crohn’s disease affects the small intestine. Ulcerative colitis affects the large intestine (the colon).

Continue to How to Get Disability Benefits for Crohn’s Disease by Meeting a Listing.